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Light artifacts-Equine Thermal Imaging application - Printable Version

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Light artifacts-Equine Thermal Imaging application - Pinpoint - 03-07-2016 01:34 PM

Hi there, just new to this field of work and trying to recognize issues while in the field, so I can have clean images for my reports when I get back to the office.
Light artifacts are my question right now. I know what they are, and I know what can cause them but I am not 100% sure I am recognizing them when I am looking through my viewfinder while doing the job.
A sunbeam coming through a window, easy to see. But if an artificial light above the horse is causing a light artifact, or if natural light coming in from somewhere else is creating an issue, (Are Shadows an issue?)I am not recognizing that.

I did my course online so I was unable to address this in a classroom situation and now realizing that I need this shown to me somehow. Is there a video that can show an example as it is happening perhaps? While looking through the viewfinder? (I own a Flir E8) A moving horse can make things challenging enough, let alone making sure the image is clean. Smile

Thank you for any help you can give. Rolleyes


RE: Light artifacts-Equine Thermal Imaging application - Gary Orlove - 03-08-2016 11:05 AM

There can be "artifacts" found when using a thermography camera, so experience is a key to diagnosis. If legs have been wrapped, or blisters or liniments have been used, they will show up as areas with increased heat. If there is a strong breeze blowing through the barn, it also can affect imaging. Long hair coats are not as good as short hair coats in allowing infrared heat to escape (hair is an insulator). Horses which are clipped for winter with patterns of long and short hair also can present problems with imaging, as can horses with mud caked over parts of their bodies.

The motion of the horse must be controlled, as must be extraneous radiant energy (don't stand the horse with one side next to the open door of a warm tack room or in direct sunlight). The horse should be given 10 minutes or more to acclimatize to the area where the thermography imaging will be done.

See http://www.thehorse.com/articles/10460/thermography-diagnosis-tool-for-horses



RE: Light artifacts-Equine Thermal Imaging application - Pinpoint - 03-08-2016 01:28 PM

Ok, That's understandable... Thank you. Smile
Next question,
1) What should I be setting the emissivity at for the hair on a horse?
2) If there ARE lights above the horse, should I set my reflected temperature for that? Or should I just turn them off, or move to another area is possible?


RE: Light artifacts-Equine Thermal Imaging application - Gary Orlove - 03-09-2016 10:12 AM

(03-08-2016 01:28 PM)Pinpoint Wrote:  Ok, That's understandable... Thank you. Smile
Next question,
1) What should I be setting the emissivity at for the hair on a horse?
2) If there ARE lights above the horse, should I set my reflected temperature for that? Or should I just turn them off, or move to another area is possible?

Set your emissivity of 0.98. Use ambient temperature as the reflected temperature settings.
If your lighting will add heat to the hair or cause artifact reflections, either turn the lights off and let them cool, or use low temperature envelope lighting (LED) or fluorescent (but beware of hot ballasts).