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Emissions from Fin fan exchanger
11-13-2014, 02:46 PM
Post: #1
Emissions from Fin fan exchanger
Hello,
I've been using IR cameras for about 10mo now (long, short and midwave), and I have a nagging question about what the optical gas imaging cameras can see. I have been doing overhead scans of refinery plant and noticed "vapors" coming from fin fan exchangers. A fin-fan is a type of heat exchanger that forces air over a set of coils to cool the process. It is also referred to as an air cooled heat exchanger. The "vapors" that Im seeing is this VOC or heated air? Can the camera see heated air surrounding equipment?
Camera:GasFindIR HSX
Setting: ME
Temp of process:285F
Thanks for your help!
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11-14-2014, 09:31 AM (This post was last modified: 11-14-2014 10:02 AM by Bobberry.)
Post: #2
RE: Emissions from Fin fan exchanger
(11-13-2014 02:46 PM)MQuarles Wrote:  Hello,
I've been using IR cameras for about 10mo now (long, short and midwave), and I have a nagging question about what the optical gas imaging cameras can see. I have been doing overhead scans of refinery plant and noticed "vapors" coming from fin fan exchangers. A fin-fan is a type of heat exchanger that forces air over a set of coils to cool the process. It is also referred to as an air cooled heat exchanger. The "vapors" that Im seeing is this VOC or heated air? Can the camera see heated air surrounding equipment?
Camera:GasFindIR HSX
Setting: ME
Temp of process:285F
Thanks for your help!

What you are seeing from the fin fans is NOT VOC gasses.
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11-14-2014, 11:45 AM (This post was last modified: 11-14-2014 11:49 AM by ronlucier.)
Post: #3
RE: Emissions from Fin fan exchanger
(11-14-2014 09:31 AM)Bobberry Wrote:  
(11-13-2014 02:46 PM)MQuarles Wrote:  Hello,
I've been using IR cameras for about 10mo now (long, short and midwave), and I have a nagging question about what the optical gas imaging cameras can see. I have been doing overhead scans of refinery plant and noticed "vapors" coming from fin fan exchangers. A fin-fan is a type of heat exchanger that forces air over a set of coils to cool the process. It is also referred to as an air cooled heat exchanger. The "vapors" that Im seeing is this VOC or heated air? Can the camera see heated air surrounding equipment?
Camera:GasFindIR HSX
Setting: ME
Temp of process:285F
Thanks for your help!

What you are seeing from the fin fans is NOT VOC gasses.

What you are seeing is water vapor (some call it steam but steam is invisible). This is easily distinguished from VOC's with the GF320. Watch the water vapor in the camera, note where it disappears. Look at it visually, it should disappear at the same geometric point. This is where the atmosphere is absorbing the water. Now if you had a tube leak and VOC's were present the cloud from the VOC leak would continue past the point of the water vapor absorption.

I have several videos of this. Send me an email if you wish. ron.lucier@infraredtraining.com

Best Regards and great question!
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11-18-2014, 11:40 AM
Post: #4
RE: Emissions from Fin fan exchanger
Thank you for your replies!
I hope this doesn't sound like I'm repeating myself, I scan a lot of hot equipment. Can I apply this to anything hot? i.e flanges and valves
Will I see this "steaming" action off smaller equipment?
Thanks for your patience
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01-04-2017, 10:12 PM
Post: #5
RE: Emissions from Fin fan exchanger
I've been doing OGI in natural gas facilities since 2010.
In my experience monitoring around fin fans you're seeing a combination of water vapor/steam and heated dust particles being sucked up and expelled from the fin fans.
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