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Thermal Imaging for mechanical components
06-21-2012, 04:32 PM
Post: #1
Thermal Imaging for mechanical components
1. Please let me know what referance tables should be used for referring to temperature rise for direct and Indirect measurment of mechanical components.
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06-21-2012, 05:59 PM
Post: #2
RE: Thermal Imaging for mechanical components
(06-21-2012 04:32 PM)Nishantkumar Wrote:  1. Please let me know what referance tables should be used for referring to temperature rise for direct and Indirect measurment of mechanical components.


I think more detail is needed.

Personally speaking I don't think that you should just rely on temperatures alone, and then look up a table. Other parameters should be considered too.
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06-22-2012, 08:47 AM (This post was last modified: 06-22-2012 08:51 AM by Gary Orlove.)
Post: #3
ITC RE: Thermal Imaging for mechanical components
The following is excerpted from an article by Leith Hitchcock which can be found at http://www.reliableplant.com/Read/28638/...ermography

...Baseline Measurements
It is strongly recommended that baseline measurements be taken of critical plant equipment. This is very important when making later infrared thermography surveys of machines or components and comparing them with previous thermograms of the same machines operating under the same load and environmental conditions. This condition monitoring procedure is useful for early identification of developing problems, thus preventing major maintenance operations or catastrophic failures.

Assessment Criteria

When applying infrared thermography to condition monitoring and diagnostics of machines and their related components, it is recommended that severity criteria be established. Severity criteria can take two forms: they can be organized into general categories that identify temperature levels or zones (versus levels of criticality), and they can be applied to specific machines or components, or to like groups of machines or components. In either case, the levels are established through experience and the accumulation of data.

In practice, no singular acceptance criteria is universally applicable to the variety of items and applications existing in industry. Consequently, severity criteria must be developed for each category of equipment based upon its design, manufacture, operation, installation, maintenance characteristics, failure modes and criticality.

Severity criteria can be established on individual machines or components. This method is based on many factors, including temperature rise vs. historical data that establishes rate of deterioration and time to failure, criticality of the machine or component to the overall process, location with respect to other materials/equipment should a fire result, safety of personnel, environmental conditions, etc. Applications could include temperature rises of critical machines, mechanical components, bearing temperature rises, electrical supply or connection rises, fluid leakage losses or even the number of tubes clogged in fluid heat-transfer-type equipment.

The infrared thermographer may use temperature difference criteria or classify the temperature severity of mechanical system anomalies. These criteria are usually reported as the temperature rise of the exception above the temperature of a defined reference.

By taking multiple measurements over time of similar components under similar operating and environmental conditions, statistical analysis can be used to set operational limits for trending and predicting the temperature performance of these components. This type of system may be used in conjunction with these absolute temperature criteria to rate the temperature severity of an exception above the maximum allowable temperature....
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07-17-2012, 11:00 PM
Post: #4
Wink How to setup condition monitoring in old factory
Hello Fellow IR Enthusiast,
I have a Flir T640 [Image: wink.gif] How do i setup condition monitoring in an old factory full of different machines with motors, bearings and electrical cabinets???
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07-18-2012, 08:15 AM (This post was last modified: 07-18-2012 08:16 AM by Gary Orlove.)
Post: #5
RE: How to setup condition monitoring in old factory
(07-17-2012 11:00 PM)Thermal Hunter Wrote:  Hello Fellow IR Enthusiast,
I have a Flir T640 [Image: wink.gif] How do i setup condition monitoring in an old factory full of different machines with motors, bearings and electrical cabinets???

See the article above.

Generally, set your priorities on inspecting the most critical equipment first, the equipment that would shut down your entire operation if they failed, or would pose a big safety concern. For instance, the main incoming electrical equipment feeding the entire facility is most critical to check, then move on to smaller substations and switchgear. When inspecting mechanical equipment, the same rules apply.

Base line measurements are most important for mechanical systems. Electrical systems are more easily diagnosed by comparing phase to phase and thermal patterns at connections.

Above all, get some training in thermography diagnosis and condition monitoring procedures before doing anything.
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07-18-2012, 11:15 PM
Post: #6
RE: How to setup condition monitoring in old factory
(07-18-2012 08:15 AM)Gary Orlove Wrote:  
(07-17-2012 11:00 PM)Thermal Hunter Wrote:  Hello Fellow IR Enthusiast,
I have a Flir T640 [Image: wink.gif] How do i setup condition monitoring in an old factory full of different machines with motors, bearings and electrical cabinets???

See the article above.

Generally, set your priorities on inspecting the most critical equipment first, the equipment that would shut down your entire operation if they failed, or would pose a big safety concern. For instance, the main incoming electrical equipment feeding the entire facility is most critical to check, then move on to smaller substations and switchgear. When inspecting mechanical equipment, the same rules apply.

Base line measurements are most important for mechanical systems. Electrical systems are more easily diagnosed by comparing phase to phase and thermal patterns at connections.

Above all, get some training in thermography diagnosis and condition monitoring procedures before doing anything.

Infraspection Institute Standard for Infrared Inspection of Electrical Systems and Rotating Equipment covers procedures and provides guidelines for conducting these inspections.
http://store03.prostores.com/servlet/inf...ion/Detail
Also check out motorsanddrives .com
http://www.motorsanddrives.com/cowern/motorterms4.html

Linas Dapkus
Chicago Infrared Thermal Imaging Inc.
http://www.chicagoinfraredthermalimaging.com
Level III
FLIR T400
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